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The Learning Collaborative

THE LEARNING COLLABORATIVE’S 
2019 SPRING PROGRAM

BE DARING!

“Look what a lot of things there are to learn!” This quote, by T.H. White, sums up the philosophy of The Learning Collaborative. You, the students, as well as the board of directors and the instructors, are involved in this wonderful enterprise for just this reason – there are so many things to learn!

From a humble beginning with just a few students in the fall of 2007, our spring and fall programs now attract approximately 300 students in a given semester in which almost 60 different courses are available to choose from.

In the summer of 2015, the board considered offering a special series in the summertime. Yes, we knew that many people were on vacation but we also were aware that many of you knew “what a lot of things there are to learn.” The response was overwhelming and in a short period of time it was clear that the summertime program would be a great success.

So for winter of the 2017/18 season the board considered a winter program. Again, we knew that a lot of you are snowbirds and that some fear driving in wintry weather but we put the program out there and once again it was a rousing success.

The summer and winter programs differ from the regular spring and fall programs in that each class is taught on just one day so many more can be offered. There is a smorgasbord of courses to choose from. Many of you bravely sampled topics that you had never experienced before just to learn something new and found to your amazement that they were wonderful! We’ve heard such remarks over and over again.

And that’s the point that I’m trying to make as we approach the spring 2019 semester. Be brave and try something new. It can be an exhilarating experience if, for example, you are an arts kind of person and learn some amazing things about Einstein’s work on relativity orif you are a technically oriented person and find out how much you enjoy the music of theopera Carmen.

Be daring and see for yourself what a lot of things there are to learn!

Marty O. Cohen, Catalog Editor

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

We have received multiple suggestions that the lunch break be shortened. As an experiment, we will have a 30-minute break for lunch, instead of the usual hour, for Session 2B(Thursdays.) We will later examine the registration figures and determine for the future whether this turned out to be a good idea. The times for all classes are provided within the catalog.

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Learning Collaborative Board Members

Carol Baretz
Sally Borgman
Jeffrey Brown
Mary Buchbinder
Phil Carmichael
Phyllis Citrin
Marty O. Cohen
Joseph Epstein
Nancy Goldman
Howard Goldstein
Berton Greenberg
Warren Grodin
Theresa Jackson, M.D.
Jean Kelly
Phyllis Levin
Sam Mazen
Marsha Safran

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

_________
Note 1: “NEW!” denotes that a course is totally new or is an extension of a prior course with all new material.
Note 2: Instructor biographies follow this course descriptions section.

SESSION 1A: Tuesdays: February 26 – April 2 (no breaks)SESSION 1A – PERIOD 1: 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

1. ISRAELI ARTISTS: THE EMERGENCE OF A UNIQUE VOICE OUT OF ZION – Rabbi David Berkman
Starting with the work of Jewish artists living in pre-state Israel and covering the seventy- year span until the present day, this course will focus on the social, political, and religiousforces that influenced a century of Israeli art. Tracing the creative impulse through theintroduction of a European artistic tradition, the creation of the Betzalel School of arts, and,finally, the abstract and conceptual works of the latter part of the 20th century, we will listenas Israeli artists tell the story of modern Israel. NEW!

2. OLD TIME RADIO – Dr. Irwin Elkins
Return with us now to the thrilling days of yesteryear for your favorite radio programs and stars such as Fred Allen, Jack Armstrong, I Love a Mystery, Inner Sanctum, and other various music, news, and programs from the early days of radio. The course includes items from Dr. Elkins’ own collection.

3. PASTRY TIPS, DEMO AND TASTING – Kim Hendrickson
Each week, Kim will demonstrate a different kind of pastry, explaining the techniques and the reasons why certain actions for each recipe are important to the final result. A different pastry, such as pie crusts, cream puffs, apple strudel, and rugelach will be demoed each week, with samples and recipes handed out at the end of each class. Food fee: $6. NEW!

4. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: THE FIRST AMENDMENT – Dr. Duncan Lee II
The First Amendment restricts government from establishing or interfering with religion, guarantees free speech and a free press, and the right for people to assemble to ask the government to right wrongs. The meaning of these rights is constantly evolving. This course will examine this evolution and will detail, in particular, the separation of church and state. This class will start 15 minutes early each day at 9:45 a.m. NEW!

5. THE ART AND ARTISTS OF LATIN AMERICA – Prof. Sandra Martin
We will start with the pre-Colombian art of the Aztecs of Mexico and end with the Chicano art of the Southwest. In between, we will look at colonial art and then move on to the work of Frida Kahlo, Leonora Carrington, Remedios Varo, Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, Jose Clemente Orozco, and Fernando Botero. (Last taught at TLC several years ago.)6. THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS – Mike Rossi
Congress has been one of the foundations of the United States government. Is it obsolete? What will 2019 bring with a shifting Congress? Will there be inertia or success? NEW!(Also given Session 2A, period 1.)
7. JOY THROUGH IMPROVISATION – Adam Sietz
Add JOY to your life through “Improv.” Stretch your mind by opening up the “dusty files”of your imagination. This improvisation series provides an enjoyable brain workout through games, exercises, and imaginary play. The results are humor, fun, and a sharpened mind.ALL NEW SITUATIONS!

SESSION 1A – PERIOD 2: 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

1. HIGHLIGHTS OF JEWISH HISTORY – Dr. Marty O. Cohen
This course will focus on the Jewish experience between the Greco-Roman period and modern times. Subjects with include the Karaite rebellion against the Talmud, Jewish communities in Ethiopia and India, Columbus’s apparent Jewish roots, why Spinoza was ex- communicated, and Napoleon and the “Jewish Problem”. (Last given nine years ago. Much new material.)

2. PRACTICAL FRENCH CONVERSATION – Amy Kanarek
Participate in real life scenarios that will help you get comfortable with your communication skills in French. Order food in a cafe, introduce yourself to a new acquaintance, etc. The course will be shaped by the students’ interests. NEW!

3. FRANK SINATRA’S CLASSIC CAPITOL CONCEPT ALBUMS OF THE 1950s – Dr. Floyd Lapp
In collaboration with the arrangers Nelson Riddle, Gordon Jenkins, and Billy May and the song writers Sammy Cahn and Jimmy van Heusen, 16 albums were produced in the ’50s containing 190 Sinatra recordings. We will dig deep into the archives of “Wee Small Hours,” “Swingin’ Lovers,” “Come Fly with Me,” “Only the Lonely,” “Come Dance With Me,” “Nice and Easy” and many more thematic memories. NEW!

4. A GIANT AWAKES: UNDERSTANDING CHINA IN THE MODERN WORLD – Jim Levey

In the past 67 years, China has made a phenomenal transformation through a careful blend of capitalism and a centrally planned economy. China’s 2025 technology program and the “One Belt, One Road” initiative underscores her ambitions for hegemony. Yet, as China takes its place in the modern world, it faces immense difficulties. We will examine China’s past, from ancient times onward, and explore its history, philosophies, and traditions to try to understand the underlying forces that explain China today. NEW!

5. VITAL MOVEMENT TM – Judith Rose
Feel more vitally alive! Offer your body and spirit the gift of Vital Movement TM, a unique program for wellness enhancement that integrates the teachings and principles of a variety of kinetic and artistic disciplines to provide effective, joyful, and restorative movement experiences for participants of all ages and levels of movement experience. Each class is adeeply focused dynamic and fluid ritual that incorporates movement, music, and words to encourage growth and transformation. All new choreography!

6. THE LOST TRIBES OF ISRAEL – Barbara Shair
Throughout the world, there is a phenomenon of newly emerging Jewish communities. In this course, we will study the fascinating stories of the Subbotniks in Russia, Christian groups and the 10 tribes, Madagascar and Togo communities, the hidden Jews of Europe, and the latest groups in India, Ethiopia, Kenya and Nicaragua. (Some new material.)

7. THE CHALLENGE OF EXISTENTIALISM – Prof. Ernest Sherman
We are free and yet we mostly escape from freedom. Such is the central challenge of existentialist philosophy – a movement that continues to play a revolutionary role in worldculture. Accepting the challenge, we will focus on the key issues of four great figures:Kierkegaard’s stress on “living each moment,” Nietzsche’s goal of “self-overcoming,” Sartre’s project of “choosing to choose,” and Buber’s emphasis on “breaking through” to the I-Thou relationship. NEW!

8. TWO PLAYS BY EURIPIDES ON THE TROJAN WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH – Alice Twombly

Euripides’ deep understanding of the impact of the Trojan War is revealed in two plays: the great anti-war tragedy The Trojan Women, and his lesser known play, Helen, which concerns the return of Helen of Troy to her husband, Menelaus. We will read the plays in that order. NEW!

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LUNCHTIME ACTIVITIES: 12:45 – 1:45 p.m.

This semester, we are offering lunch-time round table discussion groups on Tuesdays led by Dr. Howard Goldstein. This activity will be like the TED Talks but will be active rather than passive. Dr. Goldstein will select the weekly topic, announced in advance by a sign in the entrance hall, and will preside over conversations that will last as time permits. The reception room will also be available for socializing with your friends. There may be other lunchtime activities, from time to time. If so, such information will be posted.

SESSION 1A – PERIOD 3: 1:45 – 3:00 p.m.

1. FIRST CHAPTERS – Susan Barnett
Beginnings matter. Why go on reading a book unless the writing captures your interest assoon as you start to read? In this course, we will read and discuss works of fiction and non- fiction whose opening chapters compel us to read on. Materials will be provided in class.(Also given session 2A, period 3.) (Class limited to 20.) ALL NEW!

2. QUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN’T STOP TALKING – Phyllis Citrin
We will discuss ideas presented in the book (with this course’s name) by Susan Cain and also draw on other sources in order to better understand the special qualities of introverts and how they can deal with life among extroverts. NEW!

3. WHEN YOU DISCOVER SLAVE-HOLDING ANCESTORS – Barrie Peterson
This will be an overview of slavery patterns in the south. The efforts of abolitionists and the repatriation to Africa movement will set the stage. Examples of lives of the 231 people Barrie’s family enslaved will be shared. Efforts of the U. of North Carolina (which Barrie’s ancestors helped found) to acknowledge that slaves built buildings and provided wealth
for endowments and personally served students and faculty will be described. Questions of confederate monuments and reparations will be discussed. (This course was introduced in the winter 2019 season.) NEW!

4. PRINTMAKING WORKSHOP – Carl Rattner
Printmaking encompasses a variety of studio techniques used to create multiple images that

resemble drawings, paintings, or collages. In this workshop, we will explore the strategies and techniques used to create our own attractive prints using relief, intaglio, collograph, and monotype methods. (Former attendees will use these techniques to create enhanced designs.)A materials fee of $30 will be collected at the first class. Enrollment is limited to 14.

5. MATH: DELICACIES, DELIGHTS, & TIDBITS – Marc Wantuch
Math – it’s everywhere, yet hidden in plain sight. And it’s a lot more than just numbers. We’ll see why music is sweeter than noise and why black swans can be lethal. We’ll have fun cutting infinity down to size. We’ll answer the question “What are the odds? And we’ll look at Math’s history – full of big egos, petty jealousies, brutal insults . . . and at least one case of murder. NEW!

6. MINDFULNESS IN DAILY LIFE – Joan Whitacre
This course will present mindfulness practice as a key to recognizing, understanding, and letting go of habitual patterns of distraction, tension, and stress. We will learn the basics of, and then practice, mindfulness, and then learn to apply it to our daily lives, emphasizing how we sit, stand, walk, speak, and listen. Our goal will be enhanced focus, ease, and energy in daily living. NEW!The mice looked at one another and nobody spoke. Then the old mouse said “It is easy to propose impossible remedies.”

SESSION 2A: Tuesdays: April 9-16, a one week gap, then April 30-May 21 SESSION 2A – PERIOD 1: 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

1. IS NATIONALISM ALIVE AND WELL? – Marty L. Cohen
Nationalism has returned again. Is it dangerous to the world we live in? NEW!

2. GARDENING TIPS FROM THE EXPERTS – Master Gardeners of the Cornell University Cooperative Extension of Rockland with one new topic each week
April 9- The Bonsai – Lecturer to be Announced
April 16 - Starting Seeds Indoors and Outside - Donna DeSousa
April 30 - Growing Annuals and Perennials - Donna DeSousa
May 7 - Container Gardening for Spring and Summer - Vivienne Dieckmann
May 14 - Crops in Pots: Growing Vegetables in Containers - Vivienne Dieckmann May 21 - The Herb Garden - Jan Krasilovsky
Course and instructor descriptions are at www.rocklandcce.org/gardening. NEW!

3. AMERICA’S WARS: 1898-1945 – Tom DeStefano and Rick Feingold
This class will cover the Spanish-American War, World War I, FDR & World War II, and the following special topics: Louis Zamperini’s novel Unbroken, (which was made into a movie,) American propaganda in World War II, and the French Underground’s “Operation Bonaparte” escape line. Tom and Rick will each teach three sessions. NEW!

4. FOUNDATIONS OF BIOETHICS – Mary Lou Dillon
In Bioethics, we will look at the applications of technology to health care and the challenges that have arisen from them. Our conversations will explore six factors that should be considered in all discussions: autonomy, resource allocation, constitutional issues, death and dying, technology, and what might be on the horizon. This class is for those people who have no formal professional experience with medical ethics and public policy. The format of the class will be seminar fashion. (Class limited to 25.) NEW!

5. TWELVE LEGAL TOPICS EVERYONE NEEDS TO UNDERSTAND – Edward Kallen, Esq.

We usually go about our lives without consciously thinking that everything we do is controlled by law, whether it’s driving on the right side of the road or paying for groceries at the supermarket. This course will review twelve important legal subjects that all well- informed Americans should understand. The topics won’t make you a legal scholar, but you’ll know enough to appreciate the law and our legal system on a totally different level. (Repeat of a course closed out this past fall.)

6. THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS – Mike Rossi(See Session 1A, period 1.)

7. EXPLORING ISSUES OF DIVERSITY AND WORKING TOWARDS SOCIAL JUSTICE – Mark Silberstein
Using the lens of the Diversity Model of Power and Oppression, we will review present- day events and explore what each of us can do to promote social justice for all. Please know that in order to connect the course content to real world issues, and to better facilitate conversations with the voices of participants, there will be simple homework assignments like bringing in a news clipping or writing a few words on one’s thoughts and feelings about a matter. NEW!

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SESSION 2A – PERIOD 2: 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

1. NEW YORK STATE POLITICS: PART III – Bill Batson
For nearly 20 years, Bill worked in New York State politics as an operative, organizer, communications officer, and candidate. He will bring his war stories and observations to reflect on the current state of NYS politics. Though Bill is a lifelong activist Democrat,you are invited to present opposing views. This is a reasoned, yet respectful, exchange of conflicting ideas that is ominously absent in our current political debate. ALL NEW!

2. NEW YORKER SHORT STORIES SELECTED FROM PODCASTS – Robin Brancato
Each month, for more than ten years, a New Yorker story has been available as a free podcast. In each case, a New Yorker author is asked to choose a story from the magazine’s archive, read the story aloud, and engage in a discussion of it with Deborah Treisman, fiction editor. In this class, we’ll be reading a dozen of those stories, old and new. Though you may want to listen to the readings, you’ll be provided with print versions for our discussions.NEW! (Also given Session 2A, period 3.)

3. WHY U.S. PRESIDENTS DECIDED TO GO TO WAR – Marty L. Cohen
This course will be a look at various presidents, going back to the origins of our nation, and how they handled that decision. NEW!

4. ENRICHED BIOETHICS – Mary Lou Dillon
This class is for those people who have formal professional experience with medical ethics and public policy OR have completed the “Foundations” introductory class. What issues are trending in health care policy? Are lawmakers and citizens focused on the same health care issues? What are the responsibilities of citizens, if any, with regard to their own health care? The format of the class will be seminar fashion. (Class limited to 25) NEW!

5. JOYCE’S ULYSSES: PART VII – Dr. Warren Grodin
Ulysses, by James Joyce, may well be the most influential book of the twentieth century. It is not easy to understand, but with appropriate historical, geographic, and biographic support and text analysis, it becomes a fabulous read. This course starts where we left off in the fall. However, Parts I through VI are not prerequisites and a catch-up will be given for new students that will also serve as a refresher for prior students. Note: The class will bepresented only for the first five scheduled dates but will go 15 minutes extra, into the lunch hour, each time. NEW!

6. MORE MEANDERINGS IN MEDICAL HISTORY – Dr. Michael Nevins 
Medical historian Dr. Michael Nevins, the author of twelve books on related subjects, continues his series of “Meanderings in Medical History.” This course will include many vignettes about such general subjects as School Days, Madmen, Vive la France, Heart Attacks, Doctors and Literature, and Rockland County’s Varied Medical History. (Much new material.)

7. BODY STRETCHING – Charlese Randolph
In this course, we will discuss the benefits of stretching regularly for physical, mental, and physiological health. We will explore seated and standing stretches in each class. Wear comfortable clothing and sneakers and bring water for each session. NEW!

8. SHAKESPEARE’S TROILUS AND CRESSIDA – Alice Twombly
This play, one of Shakespeare’s most complex, tells the story of Troilus, son of Priam, the King of Troy, his lust for Cressida, and the determination of the Greeks to get the Greek hero Achilles to rejoin the war against the Trojans. Although the first session course on Euripidesisn’t mandatory, contrasts will be made between the dramatic concerns of Euripides and of Shakespeare, who wrote about 2000 years apart. NEW!

SESSION 2A – PERIOD 3: 1:45 – 3:00 p.m.

1. FIRST CHAPTERS – Susan Barnett(See Session 1A, period 3.)

2. THE WORLD NEEDS MORE MANDELAS – Bill Batson
This class will explore the creation of the African National Congress, the multiracial political organization that brought down the racist government in South Africa, the life of Nelson Mandela, and the global movement that helped to create the “rainbow nation.” It will include material from Gandhi, Mandela, Bishop Tutu, and others. (Bill lived in South Africa from 1994-1996 and attended Mandela’s inauguration.) NEW!

3. NEW YORKER SHORT STORIES SELECTED FROM PODCASTS – Robin Brancato
(See Session 2A, period 2.)

4. OPERA EXPERIENCE: PART I – Joan Mallory
We will follow the works of Verdi, beginning with La Traviata, and continue with Il Trovatore, Aida, Nabucco, and Rigoletto and end with a review of Verdi’s greatest choruses. This course is interactive and filled with many fun presentations. NEW!

5. THREE TALES BY GUSTAVE FLAUBERT: A SIMPLE HEART, THE LEGEND OF ST. JULIAN, AND HERODIAS – Sandra Smith
Flaubert is known mainly as the author of Madame Bovary. However, his tales, which influenced many authors such as James Joyce, are revealed as precursors to the modern short story. This short collection moves backwards in time, exploring the relationship of religion to society from the 19th century back to pre-Christian times. Note: The text used will be Three Tales (Oxford World’s Classics) by Gustave Flaubert, translated by A. J. Krailsheimer. It is available used or new on Amazon. NEW!

6. INTRODUCTION TO ZEN BUDDHISM: MEDITATION AND TEACHINGS – Carl Viggiani
Since Zen emphasizes direct experience of Buddhist teachings through the practice of meditation, part of each class will be devoted to learning the basics of zazen (Zen meditation), and to instructor and participants doing zazen together. Along with this, important Zen texts that explore themes related to the meditation experience will bepresented and discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the practical benefits of the practice ofzazen and of understanding the basic teachings of Zen Buddhism. NEW!

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LUNCHTIME ACTIVITIES: 12:45 – 1:45 p.m. (See ABOVE for details.)

SESSION 2B: Thursdays: April 4-11, two-week gap, and then May 2-23. SESSION 2B – PERIOD 1: 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

1. BIRTH OF A NATION: WHEN MOVIES LEARNED TO HATE – Arthur Aldrich
Now over 100 years old, D.W. Griffith’s 1915 silent film is still rated among America’s classics despite its blatant message of racism. We will analyze the movie and show excerpts from a completely re-mastered Eastman Museum release with the original musical accompaniment. (Last presented six years ago.)

2. MIND – BODY – SPIRIT: DEFINING THE RECOVERY JOURNEY – Steve Levy
How do people deal with adversity such as physical or mental illness, addiction, death, and broken relationships? In this course, the class will discuss and share life experiences in how we handle recovery from these difficult life challenges. We will consider the tools and resources that help us on the journey of recovery. Among them are the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of recovery. NEW!

3. GREAT THINKERS IN THEIR OWN VOICES: PART II – Richard Markowitz
The actual voices of important personalities of the recent past are rarely heard in the modern age. Recordings of distinguished people of creativity and insight, including Langston Hughes, Tennessee Williams, Fiorello La Guardia, Adlai Stevenson, Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II, Jack Benny, S. J. Perelman, H. L. Mencken, and Jacques Barzun will be heard in interviews, reminiscences, speeches, or reading from their works. (Last given Fall 2011.)

4. REVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE HUDSON RIVER VALLEY – Robert Norden
This course will include the life stories of British officer Major John Andre and American general Benedict Arnold, as well as the rise of West Point and eventual capitulation of the British. The period covered will be from 1583 to May 3, 1783. There will be particular emphasis on the hamlet of Tappan and the 76 House, America’s oldest tavern. NEW!

5. FIRST LADIES: THE POWER BEHIND THE PRESIDENTS – Mike Rossi
The First Ladies are more often than not the “eyes and ears” of the United States Presidents. There were times in America’s history when the First Ladies were the backbone of the federal government. We will explore the lives of some of these First Ladies and their feats! (This is a repeat of a closed-out course in the 2018 fall season.)

SESSION 2B -- PERIOD 2: 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

1. TELEVISION’S COMING OF AGE – Arthur Aldrich
The 1950s was a decade of growth and transition for America emerging as a super power after World War II. It was also the decade that television, a new and powerful medium, not only grew but precipitated many of the transformations in a post-war society in politics, culture, social interactions, and entertainment. (Last presented six years ago.)

2. BEGINNING DRAWING – Suzanne Altman
This class will focus on basic drawing techniques, such as contour drawing, negative space drawing, perspective, value studies, line techniques, and much more to allow students to greatly improve their drawing skills. We will work from still-life setups and photo reference.We will use pencils and charcoal. There is a $10 supply charge, due the first day of class, oryou can bring your own supplies. NEW!

3. HISTORY’S FAMOUS SPIES – Richard Burnon
This course will cover two American Revolutionary War martyrs (Nathan Hale and John Andre,) British World War I Nurse Edith Cavell, who aided Allied soldiers, Sir Roger Casement, a British civil servant who supported the Irish rebels in the 1916 Easter Uprising, Tokyo Rose, Japanese propagandist during World War II, and atomic spies Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. NEW!

4. UNDERSTANDING RELATIVITY – Dr. Richard Greene
We will discuss what troubled Einstein about the state of physics in 1905, and the inspired,

yet simple, principles that he decided had to be true, which then led to Special Relativity. The objective is to convey logically, to an audience with no prior acquaintance with physics or math, a conceptual understanding that connects the dots to reveal the true essence of his theory. Spoiler alert: it’s all about . . . the awesome symmetry of space and time! NEW!

5. THE SAVOY OPERAS: THE IMPERISHABLE WORKS OF GILBERT AND SULLIVAN – Richard Markowitz
The comic operas of Sir William S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan are still viewed with pleasure well over a century after their premiers. We will watch two films about the collaboration that produced these works: The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (1953) and Topsy-Turvy (1999) – the latter focusing specifically on the history of The Mikado. A complete D’Oyly Carte performance of the latter (1966) will also be seen. NEW!

LUNCHTIME 12:45–1:15p.m 

SESSION 2B – PERIOD 3: 1:15 – 2:30 p.m.

1. AN EXPLORATION OF SUBJECT MATTER IN ART THROUGH THE AGES – Suzanne Altman
This course will explore the various subjects that artists have chosen (or were chosen for them) over the course of history. How did ancient depictions of portrait, history, or landscape differ from those in the 16th century? How did these, then, change in the 20th century? What role did patronage play in determining the content of these pictures? These and many other questions will be addressed with slides and discussion. NEW!

2. OPERA EXPERIENCE: PART II – Joan Mallory
We will begin with one of the most famous operas, Bizet’s Carmen, and follow with several masterpieces by Puccini: La Boheme, Madama Butterfly, Girl of the Golden West, and Turandot. We will end with Puccini’s rival, Leoncavallo, composer of Pagliacci. This courseis interactive and is filled with many fun presentations. NEW!

3. A CAVALCADE OF FOLK SONG – Richard Markowitz
Well known and neglected gems of folk song will be heard, examining such varied topics as real and imaginary animals, the cowboy, traditional English and Danish songs collected and arranged by Percy Grainger, songs from Jamaica, recordings of Bob and Louise DeCormier; and variants of one of the oldest folk ballads “Riddles Wisely Expounded.” The voices of Burl Ives, Richard Dyer-Bennet, Tom Paxton, Pete Seeger, Odetta, Joan Baez, and many others will be featured. NEW!

4. A MATTER OF BALANCE – Charlese Randolph
The struggle to balance work, family, and financial and health challenges affects us tremendously. How do these stresses affect our physical balance? How do we cope with the aging process and the deterioration of our physical bodies and subsequent loss of balance? We will explore these questions and more, and will learn exercises to maintain our strength and balance. NEW!

 People learn the lessons of life in many different ways, one of which is through fables. The characters of fables are usually animals who act and talk just like people while retaining their animal traits. Here, from ancient times, is Aesop’s familiar fable called “Belling the Cat”. Let’s see what lesson this fable teaches us.

Long ago, the mice had a general council to consider what measures they could take to outwit their common enemy, the Cat. Some said this, and some said that. At last a young mouse got up and said he had a proposal to make, which he thought would solve their problem. “You will all agree,” said he, “that our chief danger consists in the sly and treacherous manner in which the enemy approaches us. Now, if we could receive some signal of her approach, we could easily escape from her. I venture, therefore, to propose that a small bell be procured, and attached by a ribbon round the neck of the Cat. By this means we should always know when she was about, and could easily retire while she was in the neighborhood.”

This proposal met with general applause until an old mouse got up and said “That is all very well, but who is to bell the Cat?”

 

People learn the lessons of life in many different ways, one of which is through fables. The characters of fables are usually animals who act and talk just like people while retaining their animal traits. Here, from ancient times, is Aesop’s familiar fable called “Belling the Cat”. Let’s see what lesson this fable teaches us.

Long ago, the mice had a general council to consider what measures they could take to outwit their common enemy, the Cat.

Some said this, and some said that. At last a young mouse got up and said he had a proposal to make, which he thought would solve their problem.

“You will all agree,” said he, “that our chief danger consists in the sly and treacherous manner in which the enemy approaches us. Now, if we could receive some signal of her approach, we could easily escape from her. I venture, therefore, to propose that a small bell be procured, and attached by a ribbon round the neck of the Cat. By this means we should always know when she was about, and could eas- ily retire while she was in the neighborhood.”

This proposal met with general applause until an old mouse got up and said “That is all very well, but who is to bell the Cat?”

INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHIES

Note: An asterisk (*) before an instructor’s name indicates new to the Collaborative’s regular program.

Arthur Aldrich is the founder, editor, and publisher of Our Town newspaper. He earned an M.A. from SUNY, concentrating in media and communications. In the 1950s, he was stage manager of an off- Broadway theater and technical director of the Folksbiene Theater on the Lower East Side. He was
an adjunct professor at Rockland C. C. and has taught more than 60 Elderhostel and adult education courses.

Suzanne Altman, B.F.A., Tyler School of Art, Masters in Art Education, Pace University, has taught art and art history in public and private schools. She lectures on art history at many venues in the Hudson Valley and New Jersey. Suzanne is also a painter who works and teaches out of her studio in Ossining. Her works have been widely exhibited.

Susan Barnett holds a B.A. and M.A. in English Literature from Queens College. She has taught at Bronx Community College and at Fairleigh Dickinson. She has also taught ESL for many years in theTeaneck Public Schools as well as at the Tenafly Adult Education program.

Bill Batson, a Historical Society of the Nyacks trustee, publishes a weekly sketch and short essay about Nyack in NyackNewsAndViews. He chaired the effort, with the Toni Morrison Foundation, that createda monument to the Underground Railroad. Bill has worked for non-profits, labor unions, and in NYSgovernment as an organizer, writer, and public relations specialist.

Rabbi David Berkman is senior rabbi at the New City Jewish Center. He received both his Master of Hebrew Letters and rabbinic ordination at the Jewish Theological Seminary. Rabbi Berkman studied sculpture and performance art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where he received his B.F.A.As a rabbi, he frequently calls on his fine arts background to guide him in his pulpit work.

Robin F. Brancato has taught English, journalism, and creative writing at Hackensack H.S., Teaneck H.S., and Kean University, all in New Jersey. She has published eight young adult novels with AlfredKnopf and two nonfiction books for teenagers with Scarecrow Press. She is a member of the AuthorsGuild, PEN International, and Writers Guild East.

*Richard Burnon, Dumont historian, writer, and lecturer, retired four years ago after a successful, 55-year career in journalism and public relations. A graduate of Rutgers, he has given hundreds of talks on more than 30 topics throughout Bergen County and beyond. His talk topics cover politics, history, women’s issues, sports, music, and humor.

Phyllis Citrin has taught Advanced Placement Biology and Science Research for over 44 years in Rockland County, NY, Fort Lee, NJ, Louisville, KY, and NYC.

Marty L. Cohen is Adjunct Professor of History and Geography at CUNY. He was chairman of social studies at the Clarkstown Central School, is the director of the Rockland County Mentoring Collaborative, and has lectured at the Rockland and Bergen YMHAs. He has written numerous articles for magazines and journals on history and politics.

Dr. Marty O. Cohen has a doctorate in Nuclear Science and Engineering from Columbia University. He has lectured on history, science, and the historic approach to Bible at Road Scholar (nee Elderhostel) seminars, the Melton Institute, alumni associations, synagogues, culture clubs, and here at the Collaborative. He is a member of TLC board and is the catalog editor.

Cornell Cooperative – Descriptions of all instructors and their courses can be found on line at www. rocklandcce.org/gardening.

Tom DeStefano taught American History at Paterson H. S. for 30 years and currently teaches at Bergen Community College. He has presented many programs at local libraries. His specialties include the American presidents, the Civil War, and New Jersey history.

Mary Lou Dillon is a certified bioethicist from a program jointly sponsored by the College of Physiciansand Surgeons of Columbia University and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She earned an M. A. in History from NYU. She has been a participant in the Road Scholar program in which she was designated as a Gifted Scholar.

Dr. Irwin Elkins, a retired administrator from the East Ramapo School District, is a musicologist with an extensive collection of opera recordings. He teaches courses in opera appreciation and is a lifelong opera buff.

Rick Feingold holds a B.A. in History and Business from Rutgers and an M.B.A. from Penn State. He has 30 years of teaching experience, currently teaching “American Business History” and “The Air Force in World War II” at Bergen Community College. He also teaches at Ridgewood Community School and Emerson Community School. He has lectured at over 50 local libraries. He has written for the Boston Herald and Christian Science Monitor.

Howard B. Goldstein, M.D., is a pathologist with interests in science and public policy, effects of climate change, sustainable development, and global health.

*Dr. Richard Greene has an M.S. from Caltech and a Ph.D. from NYU in physics. His dissertation on General Relativity was published in the Journal of Mathematical Physics. After supporting several computer operating systems for nearly 44 years, he is now enjoying retirement, playing with his grandchildren, and having fun with physics and math.

Warren Grodin, M.D., FACA, studied Joyce under John Berryman and Wallace Grey, and has lived in Dublin.

Kim Hendrickson holds a B.A. in Literature (William Paterson University) and is a Pastry Technique graduate from the French Culinary Institute in NYC. She has written three cookbooks, teaches assorted cooking classes locally and afar (NC, MN, LA), and is a regular contributor to Tea House Times magazine.

Edward P. Kallen, Esq. has been a practicing attorney since 1972 and has practiced in virtually all of the courts in the State of New York. Ed received his undergraduate degree from Penn State University and later put himself through Brooklyn Law School at night. He has had the rare privilege of being a law clerk to several judges both in the Family and Supreme Courts.

Amy Kanarek is an experienced educator who has taught French, Spanish, Hebrew, and music to students of every age. She has a B.A. in French Language and Culture from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.A. in Education from the Jewish Theological Seminary. She studied at Reid Hall in Paris and taught in Pontarlier, France, as a Fulbright Exchange teacher.

Dr. Floyd Lapp has an M.A. and Ph.D. from NYU in Public Administration/Urban Planning and has been a practicing urban planner for more than half a century. He was attracted to his profession from the personal experiences of neighborhood change as he was growing up in the Bronx. While at home, he listened to his sister’s Frank Sinatra records. City planning, baseball (he lived within walking distance of

Yankee Stadium), and Sinatra have been with him all his life.

Dr. Duncan Rogers Lee II is known by most Collaborative students through his Constitutional Law courses. Before practicing law, Dr. Lee taught Physics, Chemistry, and Earth Science at Nyack High School for over three decades and served on New York State Ed. Dept. physics teacher exam development/scoring committees.

*Jim Levey, formerly a partner at American China Mercantile and a senior manager at IBM, holds an advanced degree from the China Studies Asian Institute of St. John’s University and is now working to introduce China education to mainstream Americans at various institutions.

Dr. Steve Levy, a psychologist, has worked in the fields of mental health and addiction for 50 years.
He is the author of Managing the Drugs in Your Life, Children of Drug Abusers and The Mentally Ill Chemical Abuser, and the editor of Addiction in the Jewish Community. He has taught courses on addiction in colleges and medical schools and has lectured around the country. He is the founding director of the Rockland County Crack Cocaine Program and the Nyack Recovery Center.

*Joan Adinolfi Mallory has been an educator for 54 years both in public school and as head of the Music Education department of Nyack College, 1998-2015. She received the Model Classroom Teacher award from MENC at the end of her public teaching career and now enjoys taking her “Opera Experience” class on the road!

Richard Markowitz has made a lifelong study of domestic and foreign record catalogs (from 78s to LPs and CDs) and has focused in detail on the history of sound recordings and published scores in the areas of concert works, folksong, and musical theater.

Sandra Martin has a B.A. and an M.A.T. plus 36 hours of graduate work in Spanish. She has studied art formally at the Prado in Madrid, The National Gallery in D.C., and the Met. For 32 years she taught in Ramsey, N.J. Since 2004, she has been an adjunct professor at Ramapo College where she has audited many courses on art and art history as well as other subjects.

Michael Nevins, M.D., is a retired cardiologist and past president of the Medical History Society of New Jersey. He is the author of twelve books on various subjects in medical history.

*Robert (“Robb”) Norden studied critical theory at Wesleyan University and architecture and preservation at Columbia University. He is currently the sole proprietor of the 76 House, America’s oldest tavern, and the supervising preservationist of Norden Design, a small preservation group.

Barrie Alan Peterson is a retired university instructor at Ramapo College, Rutgers-Newark, and FDU. Active in the Rivertown Film Society, Nyack Community Garden, and the Rockland Unitarians, he recently published a summary of his family history in Nyack News and Views called “Southern Winds.”

Charlese Randolph has an M.S. in Dance/Movement Therapy from Hunter College. She is a former Exercise Instructor for the RCC Senior Institute. Classes there also included retrospectives on Broadway and the Harlem Renaissance.


Dr. Carl Rattner is a graduate of Grinnell College (B.A.), Cranbrook Academy of Art (M.F.A.), and New York University (D.A.). He is a sculptor and a recently retired art professor.
                
Judith Rose has an extensive background in the fields of education and the arts. She often serves as visiting poet and teaches uniquely woven courses in literature to readers and writers of distinction. She has garnered several nominations for the Rockland County Executive’s Arts Award in the categories of Literary Artist and Performance Poet. Judith is the founder and director of the Vital MovementTM program. Her belief in the healing power of the arts inspires her work in all genres.
Mike Rossi was an undergraduate at Saint Thomas Aquinas College, a graduate of LIU, and a post graduate of Iona College. He taught high school social studies and was a high school administrator. As a retired educator, he has authored four mystery novels, has become an education consultant, and advocates for elder care providers.
Barbara Shair was the N.Y. Outreach Director of Amishav, an organization that helps emerging and returning Jewish communities. She was the Director of www.convert.org. Barbara has lectured at the JCC of Rockland. Her current website is Becomingajew.org
Prof. Ernest Sherman holds an M.A. from The New School. He is a retired Professor of Philosophy at Pace where he taught existentialism and myths. He is the co-author of The Fabric of Existentialism.


Adam Sietz has many years of experience bringing enjoyable improvisation into the lives of all who want some fun – from ages 5-95. His career includes award-winning accomplishments, both on the Broadway stage and behind it. He is a co-founder of “Improvolutions,” an enterprise that reaches out to organizations and businesses, offering an “improv” approach to problem solving.


*Mark Silberstein was a science teacher for 30 years and a professional development specialist and training facilitator for 14 years in the Yonkers public schools. He specialized in human relations skills and diversity and did training for students, teachers, school aides, and administrators. He
has served on a Community Diversity Committee for the Human Rights Commission of Rockland County.


Sandra Smith (NYU, the Sorbonne and Cambridge) taught French Literature at Cambridge Univ. for many years before moving back to New York. She has lectured at Barnard, Columbia, Harvard, and Sarah Lawrence. She is also the prize-winning literary translator of Irene Nemirovsky (12 novels including Suite Francaise), Camus (The Stranger), and Guy de Maupassant, among others.


Alice Twombly has a B.A. in English from Brandeis and an M.A.T from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She taught Shakespeare and AP English at Teaneck H.S. for over 35 years. An educational consultant, photographer, and poet, Alice frequently lectures on literary topics at regional libraries, is the Curator of Thursdays Are For Poetry, a monthly poetry reading in Teaneck, and a member of Brevitas, an online poetry collective of over 70 poets in the NY Metro Area.


*Carl Viggiani is a Zen Buddhist Sensei (teacher). After 25 years of Zen practice and study, he was installed as a Sensei by Roshi (Senior Teacher) Robert Kennedy. He leads the New Moon Zendo, a Zen meditation group that meets at the Unitarian Society in Ridgewood, NJ, and is a visiting teacher at other Zen groups. He is also a composer and pianist, as well as a piano tuner. He holds degrees in piano performance from the Manhattan School of Music.


Marc Wantuch holds a B.A. and an M.S. in Mathematics. He has taught, tutored, and mentored in high school, college, and industry since Mariner IX sent pix of Mars and the voting age was lowered to XVIII. He has no children of his own, but has helped raise about 8000 (that’s 8x103) teenagers.


*Joan Whitacre, M.A., R.S.M.T., Dir. of Embody the Journey and Whole Women Healing, is a registered somatic-movement therapist, a meditation teacher in Tibetan Buddhism, and a writer. Since 1971, she has offered private practice/teaching in embodied presence, for healing, stress reduction, and creative living, with an emphasis on women’s needs.
 

Tue, March 26 2019 19 Adar II 5779